Month: March 2015 (page 2 of 2)

Women’s History Month: Hearing Impaired Women in History

In honor of Women’s History Month, here’s a look at some incredible women in history who, despite having impaired hearing or complete deafness, went on to lead incredible lives and do incredible things. Let them be an inspiration to us all, hearing and hard-of-hearing alike!!

Helen Keller circa 1920

Helen Keller circa 1920

Helen Keller was an American author, activist and lecturer. Helen was not born blind and deaf. At nineteen months old, she became ill and it left her deaf and blind. She became well known through several movies  produced about her life. Titled The Miracle Worker, the story told how Helen’s teacher, Anne Sullivan, was able to break through to Helen despite her being almost completely isolated due to lack of coherent communication. With Anne’s help, Helen blossomed. She was the first deaf/blind person to earn a BA degree. Keller went on to become a world-famous speaker and author. She is remembered as an advocate for people with disabilities amid numerous other causes. Helen died at 87 years old.

Gertrude Ederly circa 1926

Gertrude Ederly circa 1926

Gertrude Ederle was an American competitive swimmer. In 1924 at the Summer Olympic games in Paris, France 18 year old Gertrude won a gold medal as a member of the first-place U.S. team in the 4×100 meter freestyle relay. She also brought home two bronze medals for individual competitions. In 1926, she became the first woman to swim across the English Channel, beating the current record time (set by a man) by two hours. Ederle suffered with poor hearing since childhood due to a bout of the measles and by the 1940s she was completely deaf. She spent the rest of her life teaching swimming to deaf children. She died in 2003 at the age of 98.

Juliette Gordon Low in 1887

Juliette Gordon Low in 1887

Juliette Gordon Low was born in Savannah Georgia in 1860 as Juliette Magill Kinzie Gordon. Juliette founded the Girl Scouts of America in 1912 after becoming involved in the Girl Guides in Europe. Although childless, Juliette wanted to help girls learn practical skills and build character. It was years earlier that Juliette suffered an injury that caused her to lose almost all her hearing. A grain of rice thrown at her wedding became lodged in her ear. When it was removed her ear drum was punctured and became infected causing her to become completely deaf in that ear. Her hearing was severely limited for the rest of her life and she used a variety of hearing aids. She died in 1927 at the age of 66.

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March is National Nutrition Month – Eat For Ear Health

Eating healthy is a great idea no matter what but did you know that your healthy eating – or lack of it – can affect your ear health and hearing? Your ears are delicate instruments and, like the rest of your body, should be nurtured and treated with respect. You can protect your ear health, and in turn protect your hearing, by making sure you get proper quantities of high-quality nutrients including the following vitamins. The best way to get nutrients into your body is by eating whole foods from high-quality sources. Taking supplements is an option but it is not optimal.

Vitamin C: The best foods for getting vitamin C into your diet are

Get vitamin C with fresh vegetables and fruits

Get vitamin C with fresh vegetables and fruits

papayas

bell peppers

Brussels sprouts

strawberries

pineapples

oranges

kiwi

cantaloupe

cauliflower

fresh milk* from cows, sheep, or water buffalo

Vitamin E: The best foods for getting vitamin E into your diet are

Get more vitamin E into you diet with seeds and nuts.

Get more vitamin E into you diet with seeds and nuts.

sunflower seeds

almonds

spinach

Swiss chard

avocado

peanuts

turnip greens

asparagus

beet greens

mustard greens

fresh milk* from cows or goats

Vitamin D: The best foods for getting vitamin D into your diet are

Get more vitamin D into your diet with fresh milk from pastured animals.

Get more vitamin D into your diet with fresh milk from pastured animals.

salmon

sardines

tuna

fresh milk* from cows or goats

eggs

shitake mushrooms

Vitamin B12: The best foods for getting vitamin B12 into your diet will always come from animal sources. There is no true vitamin B12 in a plant food; there are only pre-cursors to vitamin B12 which, in a healthy body, will be converted to B12 after consumption. These are some great sources for vitamin B12:

Get more vitamin B12 into your diet with wild seafood.

Get more vitamin B12 into your diet with wild seafood.

sardines

salmon

tuna

cod

lamb

scallops

shrimp

beef/bison

yogurt from cows or water buffalo

fresh milk* from cows or water buffalo

None of the foods listed above are hard to come by. No matter where you are located you should be able to find at least some of these foods seasonally and locally. Incorporating these foods into your diet will serve to enhance your overall health which, in turn, will enhance your ear health. The best sources of any food, animal or plant, would be the one closest to nature as possible. That means non-GMO** fruits and vegetables grown without synthetic pesticides, herbicides, fungicides and animals raised as close to their natural state as possible. For large grazing animals, this means living on pasture eating mainly grass. For chickens this means living on pasture, preferably following large herd animals, scratching in the dirt and manure while eating bugs, worms, grubs, and weeds. For seafood, this means wild caught, not farm raised. Farm-raised fish are often fed a diet of soy pellets and there is no way you can convince me that the natural diet of any sea animal includes soy!

You owe it to yourself and your loved ones to eat the best you can…start today by eating a meal like this!

Steak dinner with mushrooms, peppers, shrimp and asparagus.

Steak dinner with mushrooms, peppers, shrimp and asparagus.

*Fresh milk is unprocessed. It has not been pasteurized nor homogenized, both of which harm the nutrients in the milk. All milk consumed in this manner should be from free-roaming, pastured, grass-fed animals and never from confinement operations, feed-lot dairies, or any farms who feed animals foods which are not part of their natural diet. For example, cows are meant to consume grasses in the form of grass pasture, hay, silage, alfalfa; this should be the bulk of their food intake. Cows fed mainly on corn, soy, or other non-grass items will not produce a high quality milk suitable for fresh consumption. For more information on real milk, click here.

** GMO means Genetically Modified Organism

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